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The types of voters on Election Day - as 'The Office' GIFs

"Together, we run a no-nonsense office"

The types of voters on Election Day - as 'The Office' GIFs

Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images

Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images

The Office is one of those TV series that I believe is expertly relatable because it uses a mockumentary-style setup of filming. We get to see people's 'everyday lives' in an office, their emotions, different personalities, and perspectives on the situations they are presented with.

In the thrills of this election year, here is a compiled list of the types of voters within America, through the lens of Dunder Mifflin's finest.


The 'I have years of experience' voter

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Voting is of the utmost importance to this type of person. Experienced voters are the type of people to be poll workers, actively watch the news, or attend many elections. It doesn't matter if it's at the state or national level; they want to be available to their government.

The first time-voter

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Even though it could be a little nerve-wracking at times because you may not know how to go about it, being a first-time voter is exciting! As soon as you walk into your local polling center, all you need to do is bring your ID, sign your name on a touch screen tablet ( my home town does this), and then you're given a ballot to fill out.

You'll get an "I Voted" sticker, which is all the confirmation you need to know that you are among many American people to express their right to vote in an election.

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The 'I'm not impressed' voter

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I'd be guilty if I said I was never this type of voter. These voters generally dislike the long lines, the drama surrounding elections, and perhaps even the government's inner workings. Despite this, they still take the time to go to the polls because it is a privilege.

The "I did all the research known to man' voter


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This voter is the type of person to do all the research they possibly can to be well informed of the candidates' stances, voting without hesitation.

The 'I had no time to vote, but I'm still here' voter


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It doesn't matter if this person is in school, has a full-time job, or prior engagements that can prevent them from voting. They still make time in their schedule to pull through!

The 'oh my goodness, it's 8:55 p.m., and the poll closes at 9 p.m.' voter

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This is the type of voter to evidently wait until the very last minute on Election Day to cast their vote at the polls or send in a ballot. Vote as early as possible can so that your vote matters!

Why as a mum and a psychologist I want us to talk more about dads

I am psychologist at the University of Sussex whose work is focused on supporting and researching parents - it has become clear to me that we need to worker harder to support the mental health of fathers. Here's why.

Why as a mum and a psychologist I want us to talk more about dads

Fatherhood

Photo by Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash

I am stood in the kitchen experiencing a jangling combination of exhilaration, because my infant daughter has gone to sleep, and dread, because in just four hours she will wake up again.


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Children have a place on the frontlines of the culture wars

What Should We Do When the Culture Wars Invade Our Children’s Lives?

Children have a place on the frontlines of the culture wars

You know when there’s a controversy whether to include both sides to the Holocaust in a Texas school district, the culture wars have once again invaded the children’s lives. Similarly, in Southern Pennsylvania, books by people of color were banned (or per the official Central York School statement: “frozen” for an entire year.)

These discussions by the school boards are impacted by the bills passed in government, as in the case of House Bill 3979 requiring public school teachers to present various points of view when teaching about current events and social issues. Often, the impulse to clutch pearls and to “think of the children” is a rhetorical device to further political causes. As the larger climate in a racialized society such as the United States grapple with a history of slavery and the fight for racial justice--with the most current iteration being the black lives matter protests in the summer of 2020--what the children learn in schools have become a new battleground for those who land on opposing sides of this culture war.

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