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My concerns at the beginning of 2020 morphed into fear of two pandemics: Covid-19 and racism

What was supposed to be a splendid year became one of tragedy and stress

My concerns at the beginning of 2020 morphed into fear of two pandemics: Covid-19 and racism

Photo by Ann Smith

Photo by Ann Smith

What was supposed to be a splendid year became that of tragedy and stress.

A deadly and highly contagious virus put the entire globe on lockdown. This caused us to stay confined to our homes for almost six months. Going to the grocery store, gas stations, and even going to the park requires people to wear a mask. We witnessed the global death toll rise as a result.


Also, new cases of police brutality among Black people emerged. Footage of George Floyd being murdered by four police officers went viral, and shortly after that, a man was shot in a Wendy's drive-thru. Jacob Blake was shot seven times by police and barely survived.

This is not the first outbreak we have endured, and these new cases of police brutality are not isolated incidents.

Nothing ever seems to be new when closely considered. I remind my brother to wash his hands and wear a mask for protection even though I worry about how someone will profile him while he wears it.

My concerns at the beginning of the year are trivial compared to my current ones, morphing into a tale of two pandemics: Covid-19 and racism.

Why as a mum and a psychologist I want us to talk more about dads

I am psychologist at the University of Sussex whose work is focused on supporting and researching parents - it has become clear to me that we need to worker harder to support the mental health of fathers. Here's why.

Why as a mum and a psychologist I want us to talk more about dads

Fatherhood

Photo by Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash

I am stood in the kitchen experiencing a jangling combination of exhilaration, because my infant daughter has gone to sleep, and dread, because in just four hours she will wake up again.


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Children have a place on the frontlines of the culture wars

What Should We Do When the Culture Wars Invade Our Children’s Lives?

Children have a place on the frontlines of the culture wars

You know when there’s a controversy whether to include both sides to the Holocaust in a Texas school district, the culture wars have once again invaded the children’s lives. Similarly, in Southern Pennsylvania, books by people of color were banned (or per the official Central York School statement: “frozen” for an entire year.)

These discussions by the school boards are impacted by the bills passed in government, as in the case of House Bill 3979 requiring public school teachers to present various points of view when teaching about current events and social issues. Often, the impulse to clutch pearls and to “think of the children” is a rhetorical device to further political causes. As the larger climate in a racialized society such as the United States grapple with a history of slavery and the fight for racial justice--with the most current iteration being the black lives matter protests in the summer of 2020--what the children learn in schools have become a new battleground for those who land on opposing sides of this culture war.

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