Start writing a post

What Evan Rachel Wood's ​Westworld character taught me about abuse and survival ​

In Westworld, Evan Rachel Wood's character imagined a story where she was not the damsel in distress anymore and how this affects survivors of abuse.

What Evan Rachel Wood's ​Westworld character taught me about abuse and survival ​

Evan Rachel Wood as Dolores in HBO's "Westworld"

(Photo: John P. Johnson/HBO)
Twitter.com/christybella
Former Model and Actress who is now a Writer, Feminist, and Producer
Instagram.com/iamchristybella

After watching HBO's Westworld, I was moved by Evan Rachel Wood's performance. As a survivor of sexual assault, I identified with her character, her path of self-discovery, and her fight for survival. She was me, and I saw so much of my own life in her character, especially when she said, “I imagined a story where I didn't have to be the damsel."

This was the first decision that she made all by herself.


She became conscious of her role in society, and flipped the script. This revelation did not come easy when you realize how much pain it took her to go against her own programming. For over 30 years, Evan Rachel Wood's character Dolores is repeatedly raped, tortured, and killed for the pleasure of men.

READ: Evan Rachel Wood breaks her silence, sheds light on manipulative and abusive relationship with Marilyn Manson

Evan Rachel Wood breaks her silence, sheds light on manipulative and abusive relationship with Marilyn Manson conversations.indy100.com

"We need more heroines like Wood, who will not be intimidated by the villains who work tirelessly to silence them."

She questions her own reality, and travels through corridors of her own mind to relive experiences that define her identity as a rancher's daughter, who is the perfect damsel in distress. Evan Wood's portrayal of Dolores is the most accurate survivor I've seen. Dolores made sense of the trauma that paralyzed her for years, freezing her harrowing existence into a classic PTSD response. Her awakening is accomplished through reliving the most painful memories in a never-ending cycle of abuse and hunting parties, where she was the prize for men who fantasized about raping the damsel in distress.

Reaching consciousness requires revisiting the dark corridors of the mind, and this moment belongs to Wood. On Tuesday, Wood revealed that her abuser's name was Brian Warner aka Marilyn Manson.

She embodies female empowerment by taking the lead for survivors of abuse. Instead of allowing others to narrate her story, Wood became the author of her own story in real life. Trapped in an endless pattern of abuse is hell for many of us, and I am inspired and grateful to wood for making this leap of progress.

Essentially, Wood is a real-life hero and trailblazer, leading the way for survivors by laying down the groundwork and teaching us her ways. This is true feminism.

Have you got something to say about this subject? Submit a post here and start the conversation.

Can tech help female entrepreneurs break the bias?

Women founders continue to come up against common challenges and biases - solving this problem is bigger than supporting women, it’s about supporting the national economy.

Can tech help female entrepreneurs break the bias?

Women founders continue to come up against common challenges and biases

Written by Kelly Devine, Division President UK & Ireland, Mastercard

Starting a business may have historically been perceived as a man’s game, but this couldn’t be further from reality. Research shows women are actually more likely than men to actively choose to start their own business – often motivated by the desire to be their own boss or to have a better work-life balance and spend more time with their family.

Keep reading... Show less

How am I doing as a parent?

Evaluating yourself is hard. It's even harder when attempting to assess your parenting because there's no set guide and nothing to count, measure, or quantify.

How am I doing as a parent?

Some time ago, I met my lovely friend for a drink, straight off the train from London. She told me about a very intense performance review she had at work recently, which, although scary, was incredibly useful; it gave her a general sense of how she was doing and areas to work on.

And it struck me we don't get this feedback as parents. Am I doing a good job? I have no idea.

Keep reading... Show less
#StartTheConversation by joining us on
x

Join our new platform for free and your post can reach a huge audience on Indy100 and The Independent join