Start writing a post

How Earth Minutes is driving environmental change with their new series

The 'Now Series', an environmental, action-focused film series from Earth Minutes, explores the most topical challenges of 2020

How Earth Minutes is driving environmental change with their new series

Logo of 'Now Series' from Earth Minutes

Photo caption: Earth Minutes

The 'Now Series', supported by the Dixon Foundation, aims to empower others to drive positive, environmental change. The docu-series is led by Earth Minutes, a British team wanting to encourage global change, and believe their work is the future of environmental learning. The series is made up of 5 documentaries, lasting up to 10 minutes in length, and covering a range of topical environmental challenges. This includes 'Plastic-Free Periods', 'British Farming', 'Fishermen's Kisses', 'Slow Fashion' and 'Climate Optimism'.

Each episode is led by our innovative Generation of Now (the people driving environmental action), including the presenters of Cal Major (Founder of Paddle Against Plastic and world record expedition stand up paddle-boarder, ), Joe Rigby (Former SU President for Exeter University, Conservationist), Becky Hughes (Founder of The Nifty Thrifter, Slow Fashion Campaigner), Adam Cook (Founder of Talks Wild and wildlife biologist) and Daze Aghaji (Regenerative Culture Coordinator for Extinction Rebellion Youth UK National Team, youngest MEP candidate in the UK).

The series explores the work of many incredible organizations, charities and companies, including City to Sea, Finisterre, National Farmers Union, Global Optimism and Cornish Plastic Pollution Coalition. Crucially, all the research considers society and the planet, and each micro-doc is action-focussed. The creators not only wanted to share this information, but aim to encourage people to take action now by providing a direct place to start, with petitions, discount codes and fundraising/email campaigns.

The 'Now Series' is available for schools/universities to (virtually) screen from the Oct. 9. If you want any particular episode(s) screened at your school/university, please get in touch and sign up for the Education Package (free of cost). The series creators want to make environmental learning accessible for all, to empower students to engage with environmental challenges beyond their classroom.

The series will also be publicly available on Youtube from Nov. 9, with the official trailer featuring the upcoming artist, Roy Juxon. The team wants to provide a refreshingly modern take on environmental research, aiming to make it as concise and relatable as possible.

Additionally, they want to steer away from the fear-driven approach, using optimism as a tool to empower others to take action while making it fundamentally realistic with achievable actions. The overall goal is to inspire a new generation of determined and innovative environmentalists. For more information, you can visit the Earth Minutes website.

Why as a mum and a psychologist I want us to talk more about dads

I am psychologist at the University of Sussex whose work is focused on supporting and researching parents - it has become clear to me that we need to worker harder to support the mental health of fathers. Here's why.

Why as a mum and a psychologist I want us to talk more about dads

Fatherhood

Photo by Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash

I am stood in the kitchen experiencing a jangling combination of exhilaration, because my infant daughter has gone to sleep, and dread, because in just four hours she will wake up again.


Keep reading... Show less

Children have a place on the frontlines of the culture wars

What Should We Do When the Culture Wars Invade Our Children’s Lives?

Children have a place on the frontlines of the culture wars

You know when there’s a controversy whether to include both sides to the Holocaust in a Texas school district, the culture wars have once again invaded the children’s lives. Similarly, in Southern Pennsylvania, books by people of color were banned (or per the official Central York School statement: “frozen” for an entire year.)

These discussions by the school boards are impacted by the bills passed in government, as in the case of House Bill 3979 requiring public school teachers to present various points of view when teaching about current events and social issues. Often, the impulse to clutch pearls and to “think of the children” is a rhetorical device to further political causes. As the larger climate in a racialized society such as the United States grapple with a history of slavery and the fight for racial justice--with the most current iteration being the black lives matter protests in the summer of 2020--what the children learn in schools have become a new battleground for those who land on opposing sides of this culture war.

Keep reading... Show less
#StartTheConversation by joining us on
x

Join our new platform for free and your post can reach a huge audience on Indy100 and The Independent join