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Taylor Swift was not a fan of that 'Ginny and Georgia' "deeply sexist" joke - we don't blame her

And here I thought Netflix was supposed to be an inclusive, non-judgmental streaming service

Taylor Swift was not a fan of that 'Ginny and Georgia' "deeply sexist" joke - we don't blame her

Taylor Swift performs onstage during the 2019 American Music Awards at Microsoft Theater on November 24, 2019 in Los Angeles, California.

(Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images for dcp)

Being that today marks the beginning of Women's History Month, I find myself becoming more protective of the women in my life around this time. Not that women need protecting. After all, we're an empowering team consisting of strong and independent women. However, when something or someone threatens a member of that team, I find myself becoming defensive, even if I've never met that individual personally.

Enter: Taylor Swift.


On Monday, the Folklore songstress expressed her frustration with a joke featured on the new Netflix series "Ginny & Georgia."

The coming of age show, about a family putting down roots in a New England town after being on the run, is currently No. 1 on Netflix. However, when one of its character had the audacity to criticize Swift's dating history, it kind of lost its appeal me for.

"What do you care? You go through men faster than Taylor Swift," says the character.


Ouch. And here I thought Netflix was supposed to be an inclusive, non-judgmental streaming service. In response to the joke, Swift took to Twitter to voice her disappointment.

"Hey Ginny & Georgia, 2010 called and it wants its lazy, deeply sexist joke back," she tweeted.

Swift's dating history has always been a focal point in her career, with her romances continuously criticized in the media. Once again, I don't need to explain how sexist that kind of treatment is, considering how male artists almost never have to face that same criticism over their love lives.

The double standard is real, ladies and gents.

In addition, Swift tweeted the importance for individuals to "stop degrading hard working women" before clapping back at the streaming service whom she partnered with for her 2020 documentary, "Miss Americana."

How Taylor Swift is regaining control of her music after the Scooter Braun scandal

How Taylor Swift is regaining control of her music after the Scooter Braun scandal conversations.indy100.com

Swift regaining ownership of her music is a celebratory example for women who are residing in a male-dominated industry, where gender-based power dynamics are continuously at play.

"Also, @netflix after Miss Americana this outfit doesn't look cute on you," she wrote. "Happy Women's History Month I guess."

After watching the Britney Spears documentary, Framing Britney Spears, it really upset me to learn the amount of misogynistic behavior many female artists face. However, with the rise of the Times Up and Me Too movements, one would think that kind of mistreatment has concluded.

Judging from this newfound piece of news, it would seem misogyny is still alive and well within the music industry.

What are your thoughts on the Taylor Swift and Netflix controversy?

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