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Miley Cyrus' letter to Hannah Montana reignited my inner pop star childhood nostalgia

I can't be the only person that thinks of the phrase, "Nobody's perfect, I got to work it again and again till I get it right," every time I hear Hannah Montana's name mentioned.

Miley Cyrus' letter to Hannah Montana reignited my inner pop star childhood nostalgia

HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA - FEBRUARY 07: Miley Cyrus attends the Tom Ford AW20 Show at Milk Studios on February 07, 2020 in Hollywood, California.

Photo by Amy Sussman/Getty Images

I can't be the only person that thinks of the phrase, "Nobody's perfect, I got to work it again and again till I get it right," every time I hear Hannah Montana's name mentioned.

Well, this time is no different. Miley Cyrus, the Dynamic artist that played Hannah Montana has done the sweetest thing— she penned a letter to Hannah Montana on the 15th anniversary of the show's first episode.


The Disney sitcom, which premiered on March 24, 2006, (when Cyrus was just 13-yeas-old), chronicled the life of Miley Stewart, a regular teenage girl, who went to school and hung out with her friends and friends and family. But, she was living a double life as pop singer Hannah Montana, to preserve her anonymity and live a normal life.

The show came to a close in 2011 after four seasons and a feature-length film that was released in 2009.

On Wednesday, Cyrus took to Instagram to reflect on the series in a heartwarming and handwritten note.

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"Dear @HannahMontana, I still love you 15 years later, #HMForever, Cyrus captioned the post.

"Since the first time I slid those blonde bangs over my forehead in the best attempt to conceal my identity," she wrote. "Then slipped into a puke pink terry cloth robe with a bedazzled HM over the [heart]. I didn't know then…that is where you live forever.

"Not just in mine but millions of people around the world. Although you are considered to be an 'alter ego' in reality there was a time in my life when you held more of my identity in your glove than I did in my bare hands."

Gosh, this so lovely and sentimental.

Cyrus also went on to tap into nostalgia, reflecting on how "a lot has changed" from her time on the show, even describing the character as "a rocket that flew me to the moon + never brought me back down".

"We've shared many firsts. A lot of lasts. Ups. Downs. Tears + Laughs. I lost my pappy, my Dad's father while on set filming an early episode of season 1," she continued.

Towards the end of the beautiful letter, she mentioned that she would always remember her time on the show and that she's "indebted not only to you Hannah but to Any + everyone who believed in me from the beginning ...You all have my loyalty + deepest appreciation until the end. With all sincerity I say Thank You!"

Hannah Montana will forever be a staple in my Disney nostalgia catalog, and for that I'm grateful!

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