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Nick Cannon says he's not seeking forgiveness over anti-Semitic comments

"I'm going through the process of atonement for growth, and if someone during that process forgives me, then we have then grown together."

Nick Cannon says he's not seeking forgiveness over anti-Semitic comments

HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA - NOVEMBER 21: Nick Cannon attends the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce 2019 State of The Entertainment Industry Conference held at Lowes Hollywood Hotel on November 21, 2019 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Michael Tran/Getty Images)

Nick Cannon faced cancel culture due to anti-Semitic remarks made during his Cannon's Class broadcast.

Although this happened, Cannon isn't seeking forgiveness despite the unclear future of Wildin N' Out and his partnership with ViacomCBS that ended.

In what seemed to be a bit of soul searching, he provided an apology. He states that his past comments "reinforced the worst stereotypes of a proud and magnificent people, and I feel ashamed of the uninformed and naive place that these words came from."


While watching ABC's documentary series, Soul of a Nation on Tuesday, Cannon sat down with Good Morning America's Linsey Davis to discuss the details of his experiences and what he has learned from the scandal.

In a particular scene, he was asked if he was looking for people to forgive him for the comments he made."I'm not seeking forgiveness, I'm seeking for growth," Cannon said.

"I'm going through the process of atonement for growth, and if someone during that process forgives me, then we have then grown together."

That's very mature and respectable to say, especially when offensive rhetoric about a particular group of people occurs.

The tweet that made me think of the realities of racial insensitivity in the guise of jokes conversations.indy100.com

Cannon also addressed reports that allege he was pressured to apologize."I can answer this wholeheartedly. Who pressured me?" he asked. "Ultimately, I've always said that apologies are empty, apologies are weightless.

On Wednesday, Megan McCain didn't seem to be pleased with his apology. "Anti-Semitism is still the last form of passable bigotry in America," she said. "This isn't just about Nick Cannon. It's why we, as Americans, seem to find more forgiveness in our heart for anti-Semitism than we do of racism of any other kind."

Moreover, Cannon is pursuing a master's degree in divinity, stating that religion has always been a part of his life. And now, Viacom has noticed Nick's efforts. They're back in business together.

Additionally, he also returned to radio, creating a daytime TV show with Fox and jump-starting the Black Jewish Entertainment Alliance.

Although this is wonderful to see, the journey for reconciliation will be a continuous one. One that will hopefully set the precedence for the right side of history.

Soul of a Nation airs on Tuesdays at 10 pm EST on ABC.

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