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Lil Yachty and Mattel are turning the Uno card game into a movie— and I’m here for every bit of it

"I played Uno as a kid and still do today, so to spin that into a movie based on the Atlanta hip hop scene I came out of is really special."

Lil Yachty and Mattel are turning the Uno card game into a movie— and I’m here for every bit of it

Recording artist Lil Yachty attends The 59th GRAMMY Awards at STAPLES Center on February 12, 2017 in Los Angeles, California.

Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images

Growing up, one of my absolute favorite games to play was Uno. I would occasionally play Uno in my school's cafeteria, play it with friends or famil, or even by myself sometimes like it's a game of solitaire (I know, it seems odd but I promise it was fun this way too).


With recent news on Thursday about this card game, I couldn't help but think about all the fun and often intense game sessions I've had. According to The Hollywood Reporter, Rapper Lil Yachty is developing an action-based comedy film with Mattel Films based on Uno. Yes, the popular card game Uno.

Written by Marcy Kelly, the film is set to take place in the underground hip hop scene of Atlanta, Georgia, which is also where Lil Yachty is from. He's also being considered for the lead role, despite the cast not being announced.

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"I played Uno as a kid and still do today, so to spin that into a movie based on the Atlanta hip hop scene I came out of is really special," says Lil Yachty. "It hits close to home for me."

The classic game was actually created in a Cincinnati, Ohio barbershop in the '70s as a way for families to spend more time together, which I can without a doubt attest to. Nearly 50 years later, the game is available in many countries around the world.

Mattel Films will also produce the movie with Pierre "P" Thomas, Brian Sher, Kevin "Coach K" Lee Along of Quality Films alongside Lil Yachty. Robbie Brenner, the Academy-Award nominated filmmaker, will executively produce it.

There are several films out there based on Mattel products such as American Girl, Barbie, Barney, Magic 8 ball, and many more.

As a result of the news, and due to my love for Uno, this movie will be a must-watch in my eyes.

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