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Why America can't stop talking about this breastfeeding commercial

In the ad, created by a postpartum company called Frida Mom, two mothers wrestle with lactation, latching, raw nipples, and common misconceptions that leave newfound mothers feeling inadequate.

Why America can't stop talking about this breastfeeding commercial

Breastfeeding realaties

Youtube

On Sunday, the 78th Annual Golden Globes took place via virtual broadcast, hosted by Tina Fey and Amy Poehler. Things looked extremely different during the broadcast, but some elements remained the same. Slightly similar to the Super Bowl, the Golden Globes are a moment to preview some interesting commercials, usually focusing on film or television.

One commercial garnering a lot of attention, and for good reason, is one highlighting the realities of breastfeeding.


In the commercial, created by a postpartum company called Frida Mom, two mothers wrestle with lactation, latching, raw nipples, and common misconceptions that leave newfound mothers feeling inadequate. Titled "Stream of Lactation," the commercial is both emotional and raw, and has already been classified as controversial.

Because anything depicting the realities of womanhood is always classified as "controversial."

"Am I bad mom if I stop now?" one mother asks. "Good moms should know how to do this.," the other criticizes herself.

The commercial visibly showcases women's breasts—nipples and all. God forbid! A commercial depicting women's breasts? How scandalous! During last year's Academy Awards, another commercial by Frida Mom was reportedly rejected for being "too graphic." The rejected ad featured a newfound mother struggling to use the bathroom at night.

Frida Mom | Stream of Lactation www.youtube.com

In between tending to her newborn, the mother additionally applies creams and puts pads in her underwear, while uses soothing sprays on her vagina. ABC never ran the ad. Society would rather focus on the attractive side to motherhood, as opposed to the reality of it. What else is new?

"The expectation that women prioritize milk-making above their own physical comfort is antithetical to the expectation that women continue for six months or more," Frida CEO Chelsea Hirschhorn said in a statement from Insider. "The reality is that women are blindsided by the physicality of breastfeeding—raw nipples, uterine contractions, painful clogs—no one tells you that it can be as painful as your vaginal recovery."

In addition to Hirschhorn's statement, Senior Vice President of Advertising Sales at NBCUniversal Ann Scheiner released her own regarding the ad.

"At NBCUniversal, we are passionate about bringing to life authentic portrayals of women and sharing their stories with people around the world," Scheiner said. "We are committed to using our platform to share 'HER' story—the story of so many women—and are proud to spotlight the joys and challenges of motherhood with this groundbreaking new creative from Frida Mom."

Well at least someone is committed to telling stories depicting real women, as opposed to a sugarcoated expectation.

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