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A response to "An open letter to the U.S. Capitol rioters"

What's happening within the nation is enough to make us wary of the state of our democracy.

A response to "An open letter to the U.S. Capitol rioters"
white concrete building under clear blue sky

One of the most intriguing things about this whole post was that it is relevant to the times, although fictional. The post centers around a grandmother mustering up the courage to write a letter to her grandson who was involved with the rioters from last week's atrocity of a day at Capitol Hill and the concerns many people felt once the news broke of this matter.
The letter encapsulated the same feelings many of us might have felt on that day—disappointment and shock that something like this could even be a reality within the United States. And to see this from the perspective of a grandmother that lived away from her grandson while reflecting on family life, upbringing and hardship made it more compelling to read.
It made me think about the families that could have experienced the reality of living in Washington, D.C. when all of this transpired or have family members who live or work there. What's happening within the nation is enough to make us wary of the state of our democracy.

people laughing and talking outside during daytime

As COVID-19 restrictions begin to ease, many are facing the anxiety of re-entering into society. Over the last year, we've been obligated to remain asocial, and as a result, many of us (myself included) are finding human interaction painfully awkward.

For as long as I can remember, making friends was never a difficult feat to accomplish. To my friends and family, I've always been the most outgoing and bubbly person in the room. While that remains to be true, lately I've found social interactions to be challenging and somewhat strained. Thankfully, now that I'm fully vaccinated, I've been venturing into the real world more frequently.

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Misogyny is a destructive knotweed among queer men

Progress for the LGBT+ community isn't on the cards until we address the virulent creeper in the room.

When it comes to gay and bi men's mental health, one of the biggest stumbling blocks we face is internalised homophobia and biphobia – likely from an early adoption of toxic behaviours picked up in the playground and carried on into adulthood.

Alexander Leon stated on Twitter recently that 'Queer people don't grow up as ourselves, we grow up playing a version of ourselves that sacrifices authenticity to minimise humiliation and prejudice. The massive task of our adult lives is to unpick which parts of ourselves are truly us and which parts we've created to protect us."

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