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This is what democracy looks like! A look inside the Women's March throughout the years.

As we celebrate Women's History Month, let's revisit one of the iconic moments in history, geared towards the empowerment of women.

This is what democracy looks like! A look inside the Women's March throughout the years.

Women's March in Washington, D.C. 2020

Photo: Sandra Rose Salathe

Considering it's Women's History Month, we figured we revisit some iconic moments in history, geared towards the empowerment of women. Case and point: the Women's March in Washington, D.C. Since it's inception in 2017, thousands of women united every year to participate in the largest protest in U.S. history. I've participated in every Women's March since the first, with the exception of this year's being cancelled due to the Covid-19 pandemic, and it's difficult to believe four years has passed since its origination.


So much has changed since the first Women's March. Back then, we were marching to protest the inauguration of a xenophobic president, mourning the presidential loss of Hillary Clinton. There was so much uncertainty and fear lingering in the air at the time. Flash forward four years, and that president has been voted out, welcoming a new generation that includes America's first Black, female Vice President of South Asian decent.

So I guess our marching paid off after all.

As we celebrate the anniversary of the first Women's March, let's take a look at some of some incredible moments from marches past.

Women's March in Washington, D.C. 2017 Photo Credit: Sandra Rose Salathe


Women's March in Washington, D.C. 2017Photo credit: Sandra Rose Salathe


Women's March on Washington, D.C 2018Photo credit: Sandra Rose Salathe


Women's March in Washington, D.C. 2019Photo credit: Sandra Rose Salathe


Women's March in Washington, D.C. 2019Photo credit: Sandra Rose Salathe


Women's March in Washington, D.C. 2019Photo credit: Sandra Rose Salathe


Women's March in Washington, D.C. 2019Photo credit: Sandra Rose Salathe


Women's March in Washington, D.C. 2020Photo credit: Sandra Rose Salathe


Women's March in Washington, D.C. 2020Photo credit: Sandra Rose Salathe


Women's March in Washington, D.C. 2020Photo credit: Sandra Rose Salathe


Women's March in Washington, D.C. 2020Photo credit: Sandra Rose Salathe


Women's March in Washington, D.C. 2020Photo credit: Sandra Rose Salathe


Women's March in Washington, D.C. 2020Photo credit: Sandra Rose Salathe


Women's March in Washington, D.C. 2020Photo credit: Sandra Rose Salathe

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Photo by Junior REIS on Unsplash

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