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This is what democracy looks like! A look inside the Women's March throughout the years.

As we celebrate Women's History Month, let's revisit one of the iconic moments in history, geared towards the empowerment of women.

This is what democracy looks like! A look inside the Women's March throughout the years.

Women's March in Washington, D.C. 2020

Photo: Sandra Rose Salathe

Considering it's Women's History Month, we figured we revisit some iconic moments in history, geared towards the empowerment of women. Case and point: the Women's March in Washington, D.C. Since it's inception in 2017, thousands of women united every year to participate in the largest protest in U.S. history. I've participated in every Women's March since the first, with the exception of this year's being cancelled due to the Covid-19 pandemic, and it's difficult to believe four years has passed since its origination.


So much has changed since the first Women's March. Back then, we were marching to protest the inauguration of a xenophobic president, mourning the presidential loss of Hillary Clinton. There was so much uncertainty and fear lingering in the air at the time. Flash forward four years, and that president has been voted out, welcoming a new generation that includes America's first Black, female Vice President of South Asian decent.

So I guess our marching paid off after all.

As we celebrate the anniversary of the first Women's March, let's take a look at some of some incredible moments from marches past.

Women's March in Washington, D.C. 2017 Photo Credit: Sandra Rose Salathe


Women's March in Washington, D.C. 2017Photo credit: Sandra Rose Salathe


Women's March on Washington, D.C 2018Photo credit: Sandra Rose Salathe


Women's March in Washington, D.C. 2019Photo credit: Sandra Rose Salathe


Women's March in Washington, D.C. 2019Photo credit: Sandra Rose Salathe


Women's March in Washington, D.C. 2019Photo credit: Sandra Rose Salathe


Women's March in Washington, D.C. 2019Photo credit: Sandra Rose Salathe


Women's March in Washington, D.C. 2020Photo credit: Sandra Rose Salathe


Women's March in Washington, D.C. 2020Photo credit: Sandra Rose Salathe


Women's March in Washington, D.C. 2020Photo credit: Sandra Rose Salathe


Women's March in Washington, D.C. 2020Photo credit: Sandra Rose Salathe


Women's March in Washington, D.C. 2020Photo credit: Sandra Rose Salathe


Women's March in Washington, D.C. 2020Photo credit: Sandra Rose Salathe


Women's March in Washington, D.C. 2020Photo credit: Sandra Rose Salathe

Children have a place on the frontlines of the culture wars

What Should We Do When the Culture Wars Invade Our Children’s Lives?

Children have a place on the frontlines of the culture wars
Front windshield and lights of a traditional yellow school bus.
Photo by Thomas Park on Unsplash

You know when there’s a controversy whether to include both sides to the Holocaust in a Texas school district, the culture wars have once again invaded the children’s lives. Similarly, in Southern Pennsylvania, books by people of color were banned (or per the official Central York School statement: “frozen” for an entire year.)

These discussions by the school boards are impacted by the bills passed in government, as in the case of House Bill 3979 requiring public school teachers to present various points of view when teaching about current events and social issues. Often, the impulse to clutch pearls and to “think of the children” is a rhetorical device to further political causes. As the larger climate in a racialized society such as the United States grapple with a history of slavery and the fight for racial justice--with the most current iteration being the black lives matter protests in the summer of 2020--what the children learn in schools have become a new battleground for those who land on opposing sides of this culture war.

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Why I don’t always expect my children to be completely truthful

Personally, I don’t expect the kids to always be completely truthful. Sometimes their truth bombs can be very unwelcome

Why I don’t always expect my children to be completely truthful

It's 7 am on a Wednesday.

My five-year-old bursts into our room like a whirlwind, and I blearily say good morning and remind him that he's going into school dressed in his onesie and wellies for a "wild rumpus day."

He replied, "Yes, I know. Don't forget we need to bring in sausages for the party".

Suddenly I'm wide awake and interrogating him; "What sausages? What party? What do you mean we're bringing sausages?!" I have a vague memory of going into school as a kid with sausage rolls or cheese and pineapple sticks for end-of-year parties, but I didn't think that was still a thing.

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