Start writing a post

Why Muslim women do not need to be Imams to feel empowered

Imposing the necessity of a female Imam movement on the Islamic tradition according to one specific reading and understanding of feminism is just as aggressive as patriarchy's experience in our modern societies.

Why Muslim women do not need to be Imams to feel empowered
person in blue jacket and pink hijab
Photo by john crozier on Unsplash
@arif_mahrukh
Mahrukh Arif-Tayyeb is a French Muslim currently living in the UK. She holds a Masters degree from Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales – a prestigious School of Social Sciences in Paris. She has previously worked as a journalist for a french newpaper.

The newly elected Secretary General of the Muslim Council of Britain, Zara Mohammed, was asked – quite aggressively – how many female Imams are there in the U.K. during the live Women's Hour BBC interview. Much to the interviewee's disappointment, Zara Mohammed explicitly said the question of female Imams does not fall within the parameters of her role and responsibilities.

The growing discomfort went on as the presenter insisted on putting her point across.


READ: Hijab is a state of mind and a means of liberation

Hijab is a state of mind and a means of liberation conversations.indy100.com

Acknowledged by the UK House of Commons in 2017, February 1 of each year marks World Hijab Day; a movement set up in an attempt to normalise the hijab and its practise by Muslims around the world.

Imams, in a general sense, are individuals who lead Muslim worshippers in prayer. In a global sense, imam is used to refer to the head of the Muslim community.

Muslim women do not need to be Imams to feel empowered. Islam does not require women to assert male roles: it has empowered women with rights to individual independence that has liberated them from such gender-related complexes. While there might be a necessity for female rabbis and priests, there is none for female Imams as female leadership has always been a part of the Islamic faith.

If some mosques fail to represent women within mosques, Islam should not be stained or blamed as a religion. Instead, Muslim women should combat patriarchy by reclaiming their role and space within the mosques without going against Islam's teachings.

Imposing the necessity of a female Imam movement on the Islamic tradition according to one specific reading and understanding of feminism is just as aggressive as patriarchy's experience in our modern societies.

Have you got something to say? Want to see your writing here? Submit a post to Conversations today.

How do we bring an end to the environmental “blah, blah, blah”?

COP26 needs a very different approach to climate change discussions if we are going to talk our way to success

Photo by Jacek Dylag on Unsplash
An energetic and determined finance professional, who has developed a real passion for the power of high quality discussions. Having written a book, The Art of Discussion, I am keen to share the message of the changes needed to drive better conversations in our increasingly polarised world.
https://www.linkedin.com/in/james-wyatt-a4750668/

When I was a young man playing rugby, I was in an environment where I felt (rightly or wrongly) that it was only socially acceptable to be straight, so I pretended! It may not have been particularly healthy for my personal wellbeing, but it didn't take long to learn what to say and how to behave in order to convince those around me. And it worked pretty well! So much so that when one of my teammates later met my boyfriend at a wedding, he famously said to the bride and groom that I "couldn't possibly be gay because he played rugby with me for years!"

So why is this little anecdote so relevant to COP 26? Well… because if a shy, introverted gay boy can pull off being straight, then it is not exactly hard for politicians with their armies of speech writers, advisers and spin doctors to pretend to be green. And that is what many of them are doing!

Keep reading... Show less

The 7 surprising perks of having kids

Being a parent can be rough, but the fact that I love them is a given.

Mum of two, bar manager, and lover of wine. And tequila.
https://twitter.com/Moonfacemum

Being a parent can be rough.

This week alone, I've faced homework deadlines, a sickness bug, multiple tantrums, a nasty smash on the head (their head, not mine). I've been yelled at for breaking character when I was supposed to be Wolverine, and I've read The Gruffalo about a thousand times (feels like).

Keep reading... Show less
#StartTheConversation by joining us on
x

Join our new platform for free and your post can reach a huge audience on Indy100 and The Independent join