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Lori Loughlin photos of her community service dropped — and I think it’s performative

When Olivia Jade made an appearance on Jada Pinkett Smith's Red Table Talk to discuss the college admissions scandal, recognizing the errors of the situation that she and her family were embroiled in, I assumed that that would be the end.

Lori Loughlin photos of her community service dropped — and I think it’s performative

In this file photo taken on April 03, 2019, actress Lori Loughlin arrives to face charges for allegedly conspiring to commit mail fraud and other charges in the college admissions scandal at the John Joseph Moakley US Courthouse in Boston. - American actress Lori Loughlin on May 22, 2020 accepted potential prison time by pleading guilty to conspiracy to commit fraud in connection with her role in a sprawling college admissions scandal. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP)

Photo by JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images

When Olivia Jade made an appearance on Jada Pinkett Smith's Red Table Talk to discuss the college admissions scandal, recognizing the errors of the situation that she and her family were embroiled in, I assumed that that would be the end.

But now, Olivia's mother, Lori Loughlin, seems to be regaining control of her image in the limelight, regardless of the intention.


On Wednesday, photos of Loughlin (who you may remember as Aunt Becky from Full House), were surfaced for the first time since her release from prison this past December.

Hmm, interesting.

A particular line that stuck out to me from Page Six described Loughlin with this simple description of what she was wearing:

"Loughlin was dressed casually in jeans and a 'California' sweatshirt and accessorized with sneakers, a face mask, a Project Angel Food cap, and her wedding ring."

She appears to be the depiction of the everyday woman, living in sunny California, following Covid-19 protocols, and still married.

But it doesn't end there.

The real problem with Olivia Jade's 'Red Table Talk' conversations.indy100.com

In February, someone "leaked" to the public that Loughlin was almost done with her court-ordered 100 hours of community service while also doing some service with Project Angel Food.

Again, there's nothing wrong with doing community service. I think everyone should at least once in their life.

However, the need to broadcast good deeds to appear to be evolved for self-gratification or to fix an image tarnished from prior mistakes makes me believe that this whole situation was performative.

Performative good deeds aren't the best thing to do. It's not necessary to do things to prove to yourself or others that you are a good person.

After all, actions speak louder than words.

What are your thoughts about Lori Loughlin's community service photos?

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