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Rapper Lil Uzi Vert implanted a rare diamond into his forehead— and I’m intrigued

Lil Uzi Vert has always been an eccentric and creative rapper that goes against the grain to be authentically himself. So with the latest news, I'm convinced that the Philadelphia-based rapper hasn't deviated from embracing who he is as a person.

Rapper Lil Uzi Vert implanted a rare diamond into his forehead— and I’m intrigued

NEW YORK, NEW YORK - OCTOBER 21: Lil Uzi Vert performs during the TIDAL's 5th Annual TIDAL X Benefit Concert TIDAL X Rock The Vote At Barclays Center - Show at Barclays Center of Brooklyn on October 21, 2019 in New York City.

Photo by Steven Ferdman/Getty Images for TIDAL

Lil Uzi Vert has always been an eccentric and creative rapper that goes against the grain to be authentically himself. So with the latest news, I'm convinced that the Philadelphia-based rapper hasn't deviated from embracing who he is as a person.

After giving fans a warning this weekend saying that in a four-year span, he had been paying off a very rare pink diamond from Jewelry company Eliantte & Co, he then bought the luxurious gem and implanted it into his forehead ( this reminded me of a dermal piercing). That's right, implanted into his forehead.


Naturally, many people were perplexed and intrigued by the rapper's decision to go ahead and undergo this permanent process. Some even went the extra mile to make jokes that he is becoming "Lil Uzi Vision" because the diamond is in the center of his forehead, similar to a "third eye".

In the first few days, the rapper only gave us a few glimpses of his newfound look through some screenshots from a Facetime call with his friend. But on Wednesday, he posted a video of himself vibing to some music with his diamond fully presented in all of its glory.


"Beauty is pain," wrote Uzi in an Instagram post on Wednesday. He then showed a better view of his new piercing. He also posted several Instagram Stories, saying that his diamond is in the center of his forehead and not off-centered as many assumed. "So it's actually in the middle. I just got a long bar in it because I just got it pierced and the swelling," he said. "When the swelling goes down, I'm a get a short bar so it won't move. That's why I got a long bar in it, so it can move because of the swelling. When it go down, it gone be right, though."


According to the rapper, the diamond cost him a pretty penny at around $24m. Personally, if you have the money to do something, no one should deter you from making your own decision as to what you spend your money on because they don't approve of it. Do what makes you happy!

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