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A response to "Putting Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill"

When I consider all the people I know and all the cities and locales I've lived in, I think only of the beauty, the actual visceral, physical beauty of the people and places I've known.

A response to "Putting Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill"

WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 17: A recently-found photograph of escaped slave, abolitionist and Union spy Harriet Tubman that was acquired by the Smithsonian is displayed before a hearing of the House Administration Committee in the Longworth House Office Building on Capitol Hill 17 June 2015 in Washington, DC. Auburn, New York, photographer H. Seymour Squyer made the photograph around 1885.

Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

This is a reaction post to Breanna Robinson's article, "Putting Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill is great, but more can be done when it comes to representation."

When I consider all the people I know and all the cities and locales I've lived in, I think only of the beauty, the actual visceral, physical beauty of the people and places I've known. Yet most of the popular public representations of these people and places, in news media, and magazines, and films, show far more white actors, representatives and viewpoints than I'm used to seeing and witnessing in actual life.


Maybe that's an artifact of living most of my life in an urban setting rather than in rural life, where I am now. Residents in more rural areas are accustomed to more monocultural interactions. It just happens that way. But I have to say that once I became exposed to the actual diversity of our social setting here in the United States, and the incredible beauty of the diverse lives of what really goes on here, I would not give it up for anything. Fear keeps people apart rather than anything.

Once that's overcome, access to the beauty of a changing world will envelop a person so fully that seeing Harriet Tubman on currency will bring a smile of final comprehension. I can't wait to see it. It'll be worth a million to me. As President Obama once said: "That a lot of Tubmans".

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