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Introducing Conversations from indy100: Your voice - amplified

Join our new platform and share your experiences with the world

Introducing Conversations from indy100: Your voice - amplified
Conversations from indy100 Community Guidelines

Today, we're announcing the launch of Conversations from indy100 - a new platform for people to share their thoughts and experiences in a meaningful way.

Sometimes what you have to say doesn't fit into a social media post, especially when you want to have a more considered, nuanced discussion. This is a space where you can have exactly that kind of conversation.

You can now submit posts on the subjects you care about, that you believe people should be reading about. From COVID-19 to the US election, Black Lives Matter to Pride, we want to hear from people who have something to say.

But it's not just politics. Maybe you want to tell the world about an easter egg you spotted in a new TV show or explain exactly why you love your favorite band so much. This is your chance to write about what you care about.

The best posts will be shared across indy100 and our social media accounts. Outstanding and frequent authors also have the chance to be featured on The Independent, one of the world's biggest quality news brands, and may even be invited to write separately for them.

Sign up here, write your first post, and start the Conversations.

Children have a place on the frontlines of the culture wars

What Should We Do When the Culture Wars Invade Our Children’s Lives?

Children have a place on the frontlines of the culture wars
Front windshield and lights of a traditional yellow school bus.
Photo by Thomas Park on Unsplash

You know when there’s a controversy whether to include both sides to the Holocaust in a Texas school district, the culture wars have once again invaded the children’s lives. Similarly, in Southern Pennsylvania, books by people of color were banned (or per the official Central York School statement: “frozen” for an entire year.)

These discussions by the school boards are impacted by the bills passed in government, as in the case of House Bill 3979 requiring public school teachers to present various points of view when teaching about current events and social issues. Often, the impulse to clutch pearls and to “think of the children” is a rhetorical device to further political causes. As the larger climate in a racialized society such as the United States grapple with a history of slavery and the fight for racial justice--with the most current iteration being the black lives matter protests in the summer of 2020--what the children learn in schools have become a new battleground for those who land on opposing sides of this culture war.

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Why I don’t always expect my children to be completely truthful

Personally, I don’t expect the kids to always be completely truthful. Sometimes their truth bombs can be very unwelcome

Why I don’t always expect my children to be completely truthful

It's 7 am on a Wednesday.

My five-year-old bursts into our room like a whirlwind, and I blearily say good morning and remind him that he's going into school dressed in his onesie and wellies for a "wild rumpus day."

He replied, "Yes, I know. Don't forget we need to bring in sausages for the party".

Suddenly I'm wide awake and interrogating him; "What sausages? What party? What do you mean we're bringing sausages?!" I have a vague memory of going into school as a kid with sausage rolls or cheese and pineapple sticks for end-of-year parties, but I didn't think that was still a thing.

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