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Highlights from the Women's March in D.C.

Carrying creative signs and donning an array of interesting costumes, thousands gathered in D.C. Saturday for the 2nd Women's March of 2020 to honor the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Highlights from the Women's March in D.C.

Protestors dressed as 'Handmaids' at the Women's March in Washington, D.C.

Photo credit: Sandra Salathe

Saturday marked the 2nd Women's March of 2020, where thousands gathered in D.C. to honor the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and protest the Supreme Court nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett. Almost four years after the initial march, where marchers unified to protest the inauguration of President Trump, thousands took to the D.C. streets once again.


The march kicked off at Freedom Plaza around 11 a.m. Saturday morning, where participants gathered for a short rally, followed by a spirited, socially-distanced walk towards the Supreme Court. Marchers donned eclectic ensembles, ranging from red robes and white bonnets (an homage to Margret Atwood's Handmaid's Tale) to white lace collars and black robes honoring the late Ginsburg.

The march looms on one of the most controversial elections, which will likely echo throughout generations to come. It also comes amid a global pandemic, an economic recession predominately affecting women of color, and a Supreme Court nomination likely to threaten reproductive justice. So much is at stake this time around.

"Now, four years later, with 17 days to go, we're going to finish what we started," said Rachel O'Leary Carmona, executive director of the Women's March. "His presidency began with women marching, and now it's going to end with women voting."

So, let's finish what we started and take this fight to the polls on Nov. 3rd.

A couple stands near Freedom Plaza, holding signs for the Women's March in Washington, D.C. Photo Credit: Sandra Salathe


Two friends hold signs as they attend the Women's March in Washington, D.C. Photo credit: Sandra Salathe


Group of protestors stand in Freedom Plaza during Women's March in Washington, D.C. Photo credit: Sandra Salathe


Protestors dressed as Handmaids at the Women's March in Washington, D.C. Photo credit: Sandra Salathe


Family of three stands in Freedom Plaza as they attend the Women's March in Washington, D.C.Photo credit: Sandra Salathe


Toddler smiles for the camera at Women's March in Washington, D.C.Photo credit: Sandra Rose Salathe


Abortion activists clash with Pro-Life marchers at Women's March in Washington, D.C.Photo credit: Sandra Salathe


Woman holds sign at the Women's March in Washington, D.C. Photo credit: Sandra Salathe


Protestors stand outside the Supreme Court during Women's March in Washington, D.C. Photo credit: Sandra Salathe


Protestor holds sign high at the Women's March in Washington, D.C. Photo credit: Sandra Salathe

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